RESOLVE

Wolf

Conservation and management of the Wolf has led to many controversies. To some, there is no species more iconic of wilderness and the American West. To others, the species is a dangerous predator of livestock and game, and a threat to their livelihoods. The species was nearly eradicated in the lower 48, but has now recovered sufficiently to have been removed from the Endangered Species list in some locations.

RESOLVE believes that decisions on management of wolves need to be fact-based, and respective of diverse points of view and interest. Our work on wolves include:

Evaluation of genetic data and determination of the taxonomic status of different subspecies of wolf. This project was important in determining which populations were genetically distinct, and therefore could be protected under the Endangered Species Act.

Evaluation of Wyoming management plans. This review examined whether the proposed hunting of wolves in Wyoming was well-planned in terms of maintaining the species above the threshold that would trigger re-listing under ESA

Selected RESOLVE Projects

WDFW Wolf Working Group
RESOLVE provided facilitation and mediation services for a multi-stakeholder working group tasked by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife with providing advice on development of a statewide management plan for the gray wolf. The group included ranchers, farmers, hunters, environmentalists, and wolf advocates. More information about the Wolf Working Group and the development of the wolf plan is available here.

Southwest Wolf Information Network
RESOLVE provided facilitation and process consultation support to a group of ranchers, tribes, hunters, agency staff, wildlife advocates, and educators who met to develop a regional collaborative that develops educational projects to work on together.

ODFW Wolf Advisory Committee
RESOLVE provided facilitation and mediation services for an advisory group tasked by the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission with developing a statewide management plan for the gray wolf. The group, which included ranchers, farmers, hunters, environmentalists, and wolf advocates, met 11 times throughout the state in developing a plan they provided to the Commission. The Commission unanimously approved the plan after additional public input. The final Oregon Wolf Conservation and Management Plan is available here.

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