RESOLVE

Palliative and End-of-Life Care Collaborative Policy Framework to Improve Care for Americans Living with Serious Illness

In fall of 2016, the Health Team at RESOLVE, in coordination with The Pew Charitable Trusts, convened stakeholders in the fields of palliative care and end-of-life care to provide the incoming Administration with prioritized recommendations for advancing policy to improve care for the millions of Americans living with serious illness.

In the months since, these representatives from health associations, consumer coalitions, the health insurance industry, and hospital and hospice organizations have worked collaboratively to identify and articulate critical issues facing seriously ill patients, their families and caregivers, and outline key executive and legislative actions that would enable the health care system to better care for these individuals. Based on extensive research and the experience of practitioners in the field, the group recommended policies be put in place to:

  • Improve the workforce that cares for patients near the end of their lives, through increased education and training.
  • Promote measures that reinforce delivery of high-quality end-of-life care.
  • Expand payment and care models to test innovative methods to provide this care.
  • Support additional research to find ways to improve the quality of palliative and end-of-life care.
  • Ensure that patients’ preferences for end-of-life care are clearly recorded in electronic health records that are accessible to caregivers.

On February 21st, these consensus recommendations were sent to top officials within the new Administration. The collaborative is now working to gather further endorsements for its recommendations, and to develop and implement a strategic outreach plan to build support for its recommendations on the Hill and among the public. Their full letter and recommendations can be found on RESOLVE’s website here and on The Pew Charitable Trusts’ here.


Read the full letter and report:

Palliative Care and End-of-Life Care: Improving Person-Centered Care for Patients with Serious Illness

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